Tag Archives: literary fiction

Characters who identify with their authors

A writer friend who’d offered to read my second draft of a short novel recently gave me the following marginal feedback: ‘I’m having a little trouble sifting fiction from reality. I assume that won’t be a problem for most of … Continue reading

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Seasoned Thinking – Sydney Writers’ Festival 2014

LYNNE SEGAL: THE MARCH OF TIME May 23, 11.30am–12.30pm (‘Social activist, feminist, author and academic Lynne Segal turns her formidable gaze towards the thorny issue of aging. She discusses her new book Out of Time, which has garnered widespread acclaim.’) … Continue reading

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To PhD or Not to PhD?

These days when asked to provide journal or anthology editors with a short bio, I don’t bother to mention my MA. And this isn’t because, like the growing ranks of my peers, I’m a PhD candidate or a Doctor; I’m … Continue reading

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The Uses of Ambiguity

If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, meaning is too. After seeing Francis Bacon’s paintings at the Art Gallery of NSW (beautiful or ugly? human or animal? wrestling or fucking?), I found an incisive review of an essay … Continue reading

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Heads in the Cloud: how digital self-publishing is dimming literature’s sun

Exponential changes to the publishing landscape in recent years, producing a changed psychic climate for writers, have placed certain kinds of fiction on the endangered list. In theory, all known narrative forms should be a possibility. We now have unprecedented … Continue reading

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Show & Tell: the best of both worlds

‘I was not the first one to find the book. There were notes in the margins…’ So begins ¶2 of Jeanette Winterson’s Art & Lies (1994). And this opening gambit amused me more because it applied to the book before me. … Continue reading

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What the new breed of reader wants (or Who’s using whom?)

Five years ago, even the most entrenched industry veterans, aware that conventional publishing might be in trouble, were already scrambling to make themselves indispensable. Back then I paid $75, half price, for a one-hour pilot consultation with an incontestably qualified … Continue reading

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